Sunday, April 28, 2013

P-series Technical Notes: P200

If you are in the market for a scooter, the P200 is a good choice. It is a well designed "classic" scooter with power to spare. Many people complain about the angularity of the P-Series, but they are still very waspy. The front mudgard and cowls are what give the "P" it's look. I think it really suits an electronic music lifestyle (reminds me of the old JX-3P synth in my room). Anyway, I find the specifications give a good insight into the workings of this infamous series. What follows is a list of specifications for the Vespa P200 under ideal conditions.


Physical Specs
-------------------

Overall Length:        1760 mm (69.3 in)
Overall Width:         695 mm (27.3 in)
Overall Height:        1110 mm (43.7 in)
Wheelbase:             123 5mm (48.7 in)
Ground Clearance:  225 mm (8.9 in)
Dry Weight:            108 kg (238 lb)
Chassis No. Prefix: VSX 1 T
Engine No. Prefix:  VSE 1 M
Typical Speeds:
Top:                       120 kph (75 mph)
Cruise:                   104 kph (65 mph)

Engine & Transmission Specs
----------------------------------------

Engine 
Type:                     Single cylinder fan-cooled two stroke
Bore:                     66.5 mm (2.618 in)
Stroke:                  57.0 mm (2.240 in)
Displacement:        197.97cc (12.080 cu in.)
Compression:        9.8:1

Cylinder
Type:                    Cast Aluminum Alloy

Cylinder Barrel
Type:                   Cast Iron
Bore Sizes:          66.5 mm (2.618 in)
1st Oversize:       66.7 mm (2.626 in)
2nd Oversize:      66.9 mm (2.634 in)
3rd Oversize:       67.1 mm (2.642 in)

Piston
Standard Diamter:   66.292 mm (2.6099 in)
Oversizes:               3, in 0.2 mm (0.0079 in increments)
Ring free end gap:   0.025-0.040 mm (0.010-0.016 in)

Crankshaft Assembly
Max. Runout
At mainshaft ends:   0.03mm (0.0012 in)
At flywheel faces:    0.02mm (0.0079 in)

Clutch
Type: Wet, Multiplate
No. of Friction Plates: 3
No. of Plain Plates: 2

Gearbox
Type: 4 speed constant mesh
Ratios:
1st Gear: 14.47:1
2nd Gear: 10.28:1
3rd Gear: 7.31:1
4th Gear: 5.36:1

Fuel System & Lubrication
------------------------------------

Carburettor
Make:           Dell'Orto [sic]
Type:            SI24/24E (older models may have an SI20/20D)
Venturi Size:  24 mm (0.95 in)

Jets 
Main:         116
Diffuser:     BE3
Atomizer:   60
Idle SS:     160
Starter Jet: 60

Air Filter
Type: Pleated Fabric and Gauze

Engine Lube 
Type: Premix or Injection
Pre-Mix Oil Ratio: 50:1 (2%)
Two Stroke Oil: Good Quality [ash free] 2 Stroke Oil (Synthetic or Natural)

Gearbox Lube
Oil Grade: [Non-Detergent] SAE 30 motor oil
Capacity: Holding the bike straight up and down, the oil will drip from the filler hole when full. (approx. 250mL 8.5oz)

Physical Fuel Line Length 
length: 2 feet

Wheels Brakes and Tires
----------------------------------

Wheels 
Type: Pressed steel split rims, spare wheel available as option. Wheels are interchangeable
Size: 2.10 X 10

Brakes 
Type: Internal expanding drum brakes, single leading shoe (SLS) type, front and rear.

 Tires 
Size: 3.50 X 10, front and rear Pressure (for factory tires)
Front: 17.6 psi (1.23 kg/cm2)
Rear (up to 180 pound load): 25.8 psi (1.8 kg/cm2)
Rear (over 180 pound load): 36.7 psi (2.58 kg/cm2)

Source: http://www.vespamaintenance.com/specs.html

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Difference between P-Range series


1983/84 is the transition year for P -> PX. They were phased in gradually as the factory ran out of the old parts. The new "PX" scooters were called the "Arcobaleno series" to signify the new improvements. "Arcobaleno" means "rainbow", and you can spot them by their rainbow badge. My suspicion as to why they became "PX---E" is because they added the electronic ignition to the 125/150 engines. Previously, the 125/150 were called "P125/150X", so they stuck the "E" on the end, moved the "X" to the front of all the P-range names, and thus the "PX" was born.

"P" was the scooter model name 
"E" means electronic ignition.
"X" meant it had turnsignals
"elestart" means electric start


With the introduction of the Arcobaleno series:
*electronic ignition was added to the 125/150 engines.
*the EFL gearing was introduced.
*the fuel gauge was added (and the "reserve"position on the petcock was dropped).
*the horncast and headset got more angular.
*the glovebox got larger.
*the front axle was increased to 20mm from 16mm
*the front drum brake was "improved" (or so I hear. it was still pretty cruddy)
*the centermat changed from rubber to plastic.
*the fender crest was widened and changed to plastic.
*the cowl locking mechanism was redesigned so the locking levers were under the seat, to discourage theft.

A couple years later, the electric start was added as an option. On all European models, autolube and/or a battery was an option, not standard. Eventually, the "Arcobaleno" name was dropped, and everything just became PX---E. Even later, the mirrors were moved to the top of the headset, the "E" was dropped, front disc was added, the horncast got more rounded and sported a square badge, and the speedometer and badging got a makeover. (the "Disc" and "Millenium Edition" series).


 Source: http://modernvespa.com/forum/topic55582

Monday, April 22, 2013

The birth of a legend: VESPA

The Vespa (which means “wasp” in Italian) was the result of Enrico Piaggio’s determination to create a low cost product for the masses. As the war drew to a close, Enrico studied every possible solution to get production in his plants going again. A motor scooter was produced, based on a small motorcycle made for parachutists. The prototype, known as the MP5, was nicknamed “Paperino” (the Italian name for Donald Duck) because of its strange shape, but Enrico Piaggio did not like it, and he asked Corradino D’Ascanio to redesign it.


But the aeronautical designer did not like motorcycles. He found them uncomfortable and bulky, with wheels that were difficult to change after a puncture. Worse still, the drive chain made them dirty. However, his aeronautical experience found the answer to every problem. To eliminate the chain he imagined a vehicle with a stress-bearing body and direct mesh; to make it easier to ride, he put the gear lever on the handlebar; to make tyre changing easier he designed not a fork, but a supporting arm similar to an aircraft carriage. Finally, he designed a body that would protect the driver so that he would not get dirty or dishevelled. Decades before the spread of ergonomic studies, the riding position of the Vespa was designed to let you sit comfortably and safely, not balanced dangerously as on a high-wheel motorcycle.


Corradino D’Ascanio only needed a few days to refine his idea and prepare the first drawings of the Vespa, first produced in Pontedera in April 1946. It got its name from Enrico Piaggio himself who, looking at the MP 6 prototype with its wide central part where the rider sat and the narrow “waist”, exclaimed, “It looks like a wasp!” And so the Vespa was born.
On April 23, 1946 Piaggio & C. S.p.A. filed a patent with the Central Patents Office for inventions, models and brand names at the Ministry of Industry and Commerce in Florence, for “a motor cycle with a rational complex of organs and elements with body combined with the mudguards and bonnet covering all the mechanical parts”. In a short space of time the Vespa was presented to the public, provoking contrasting reactions. However, Enrico Piaggio did not hesitate to start mass production of two thousand units of the first Vespa 98 cc. The new vehicle made its society debut at Rome’s elegant Golf Club, in the presence of U.S. General Stone who represented the Allied military government. Italians saw the Vespa for the first time in the pages of Motor (March 24, 1946) and on the black and white cover of La Moto on April 15, 1946.


FIRST VESPA PATENT

On April 23, 1946 Piaggio & C. S.p.A. filed a patent with the Central Patents Office for inventions, models and brand names at the Ministry of Industry and Commerce in Florence, for "a motor cycle with a rational complex of organs and elements with body combined with the mudguards and bonnet covering all the mechanical parts". In a short space of time the Vespa was presented to the public, provoking contrasting reactions. However, Enrico Piaggio did not hesitate to start mass production of two thousand units of the first Vespa 98 cc. The new vehicle made its society debut at Rome's elegant Golf Club, in the presence of U.S. General Stone who represented the Allied military government. Italians saw the Vespa for the first time in the pages of Motor (March 24, 1946) and on the black and white cover of La Moto on April 15, 1946.

Friday, April 5, 2013

The Mountain Ride 2013 by Gopro












It's not easy to use DSLD camera or cellphone in smoggy weather. So, Gopro is the best choise.
Photo by Quynh Skulls.

The Mountain Ride 2013 (4000km vespa trip): Day 11 - 12

Main map of our trip. Riding through Vietnam in 14 national street. (Ho Chi Minh street). PLS NOTE THAT HOANG SA and TRUONG SA ISLAND ARE OFF VIỆT NAM, NOT FUCKING CHINA

 Day 11: Đồng Văn town -> Quản Bạ town (M->N)

 Drink coffee in the morning at the very old coffee shop. Coffee is ok but music and waitor here are terrible.


 Mã Pí Lèng pass, one of 4 biggest pass in Vietnam, very high and long. I cant talk anything about this pass, because no world can say about this beautiful.



 Me and my girlfriend Quỳnh Skulls.

 Hin, my brother, riding with me from Saigon.


 My dear,